More Grief Psychology: Loss, Change and Control

Again, from Psychologist Sue Morris’ “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles”: Loss, change and control Loss, change and control are three of the major psychological components of grief. When somebody dies we naturally focus on ‘who’ died. But with any death comes the loss of so many other things. These […]

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A Week of Grief Psychology

Psychologist Sue Morris, the Director of Bereavement Services at the Dana-Farber cancer Institute in Boston, has written an accessible and useful article, “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles,” for the Australian Psychological Society website.  This week we will explore the ideas she explains in the article. Understanding grief No two people […]

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When Your Grieving Children Encounter Comforting Myths

The Brights have produced a white paper on how to handle death and grieving in your secular family.  It is particularly useful for those helping secular children process grief. “It is all but inevitable that children will encounter ideas about death and what happens to the dead that will differ from those of their secular […]

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Finding Secular Meaning in Grief

From George W.’s “Meaning In A Time Of Mourning: Secular Celebration Of A Life Well Lived,” in his Misplaced Grace blog: If there is one thing that I believe important to take away from the grief of losing someone who was close to us- if there is something that we ought to take away from our […]

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Does grief exhaust you?

From the very helpful and mostly secular grief site, “Hello Grief,” an article about how and why grief exhausts us and what to do about it: The work of grief is a constant drain to the system. It is taxing on many levels and many layers – conscious and unconscious, physical as well as emotional… …Pay […]

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