About Rebecca Hensler

Rebecca Hensler founded Grief Beyond Belief in 2011, following the death of her infant son Jude. She runs Grief Beyond Belief from her home and continues to write and speak on the topics of grief without faith and secular grief support.

Author Archive | Rebecca Hensler

What Color is Your Grief?

I mourn in grey, grey as the sleeted wind the bled shades of twilight, gunmetal, battleships, industrial paint. Marge Piercy In what color do you mourn?

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A Little Bleak Humor About Working While Grieving

Suzanne posted this apt piece about the workplace perils grieving parents face on the GBB Facebook Page.  Most apply to anyone grieving, actually.  Here’s an excerpt from “A Bereaved Parent’s (tongue-in-cheek) Guide to Job Postings” in The Mourning After Natasha blog. The job posting says: “Must be flexible and willing to take on new challenges.” What it really […]

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Open the Box: Dr. Nancy Berns on the Problems with “Closure”

From a TEDx  talk by Nancy Berns, PhD, “Beyond Closure: The Space Between Joy and Grief”: As humans, we have the capacity to carry joy and grief at the same time. So what would happen, if rather than telling people to put a lid on their pain, we open the box and listen to people’s […]

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“we supply the purpose”

From “Purpose Matters” in KimBoo York’s awesome secular grief blog, Patience and Fortitude: I suggest that we turn the definition and application of “purpose” from something suffered for mysterious, supernatural reasons, and use it in its true form: a sense of determination to create a life for yourself that is built upon the love you […]

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Grief Psychology Week Conclusion: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

We have reached the end of a week of grief psychology posts, featuring  Sue Morris’ “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles.”  The article closes with a brief explanation of how Cognitive Behavioral Therapy itself functions in treating grief in a psycho-therapeutic setting: CBT for grief The goal of CBT is to […]

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Grief Psychology Continued: The Wave-Like Pattern of Grief

This is the fourth in a series of excerpts from Sue Morris’ “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles“: The wave-like pattern of grief The experience of grief is best described as following a wave-like pattern which provides a useful framework in helping the bereaved understand their experience and, in turn, […]

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Grief Psychology Continued: Expectations

More from Sue Morris’ “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles“: Expectations How someone thinks about life and death has a significant impact on how he or she will grieve. Most people expect that children will outlive their parents and that the majority of us will live long and healthy lives. […]

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More Grief Psychology: Loss, Change and Control

Again, from Psychologist Sue Morris’ “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles”: Loss, change and control Loss, change and control are three of the major psychological components of grief. When somebody dies we naturally focus on ‘who’ died. But with any death comes the loss of so many other things. These […]

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A Week of Grief Psychology

Psychologist Sue Morris, the Director of Bereavement Services at the Dana-Farber cancer Institute in Boston, has written an accessible and useful article, “The psychology of grief — applying cognitive and behaviour therapy principles,” for the Australian Psychological Society website.  This week we will explore the ideas she explains in the article. Understanding grief No two people […]

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When Your Grieving Children Encounter Comforting Myths

The Brights have produced a white paper on how to handle death and grieving in your secular family.  It is particularly useful for those helping secular children process grief. “It is all but inevitable that children will encounter ideas about death and what happens to the dead that will differ from those of their secular […]

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